Hiking in Park City

Hiking Trails in Park City

Hiking in Park City

Grab your backpack and your boots!  Enjoy a leisurely stroll on the Rail Trail or take a walk on the wild side along the more challenging terrain of the Mid-Mountain Trail.  The Park City area offers over 150 miles of public trails to accommodate families as well as the extreme hiking enthusiast.  Be sure to visit MountainTrails.org for for maps and information on Park City Trails.

From sweeping views to technical trails, you won’t want to miss these Park City hikes.

  • Armstrong Trail.  This relatively new trail is the perfect go-to for hot summer days. Begin at the Silver Star lift and wind your way up through the tall aspens and picturesque evergreens. On your way to the top, you’ll pass a few ski runs and the base of the King Con lift before reaching a clearing with a phenomenal view of the town. Along the way, you can choose between two shorter loop options: Dawns and H.A.M. Or, head to the top and continue on to the mid-mountain trail and down the Spiro Trail. This trail is ideal for hikers, as it’s limited to uphill bike traffic only. The best part of this trail, hands down, is that it starts and ends near the Silver Star Café, and there’s nothing better than celebrating a hike with a well-deserved post-hike beer and a delicious meal.
  • Mid Mountain Trail.  Also located at the ski resorts, the Mid-Mountain trail stretches 23 miles from Deer Valley, through Park City Mountain and Canyons, to just above the Utah Olympic Park. Tackle rolling hills through trees and across ski runs as you discover new views around every corner, all while hovering around 8,000 feet of elevation. And don’t fret, you can hike just a section of it if you’re not in the mood for a 23-mile hike.
  • Round Valley.  These short fun paths dip and dive their way around the Round Valley Protected Open Space. The motto here is “choose your own adventure,” as you’re sure to come to plenty of forks in the road and break-off directionals. As an added bonus, your dog will absolutely love it here, as they’re allowed to be off-leash throughout the park.  Local Tip: Avoid these trails in the heart of summer, they are exposed and can get hot.
  • Rob's Trail.  Starting at Bear Hollow Drive, this popular trail winds up the south side of the Utah Olympic Park. The wide smooth trail gradually works it’s way up through aspens and pines giving you glimpses of the surrounding resorts along the way. Plan an out-and-back or continue on to meet up with the Mid-Mountain Trail or Ambush Trail.  (Local Tip: Rob’s is limited to up-hill bike traffic only, making it a safer option for hiking.)
  • Iron Mountain.  This local favorite is a popular after-work or weekend go-to. It’s a relatively short hike, but the elevation gain will definitely make your glutes burn. It’s well worth it. At the top, you’ll be awarded with a fantastic view of downtown and an ideally placed bench to admire it all from. We recommend doing it in early spring or the peak of fall to admire the aspen leaves.
  • Flying Dog Trail / Glenwild.  Located on the south side of I-80, these trails are popular for hikers, mountain bikers, and runners. Choose from a variety of out and backs or loops that wind through the green hills on the outskirts of town. Along your hike, find bridges, streams, and expansive views looking out towards the town or drop into the exquisite gated neighborhoods to admire the scattered mansions that will take your breath away.
  • Rail Trail.  Completely non-motorized, this trail spans 28 miles from the neighborhoods of Park City to Echo Reservoir.  Once a railroad used to transfer coal and silver, this trail is relatively flat and is the perfect place to get in your long bike ride, run, Nordic ski, or walk. Especially since along the way, you’ll find the iconic Union Pacific Bridge as well as expansive views of the Park City ridgeline. And, just like the mid-mountain trail, you don’t have to do the complete 28 miles to experience this trail. There are several access points throughout town where you can plan shorter out and back hikes.

 

Due to Park City’s high altitude (most trails are above 7,000 feet) hikers should bring plenty of water and sunscreen. Layer your clothing; pack a hat and a rain poncho. Mountain weather is very changeable – be prepared before you go.